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The Atkinson Hyperlegible Font (which you can read about and download for free here:
brailleinstitute.org/freefont) is so cool!

Legibility is more art than science: what's more legible for one person will be The Worst for someone else, and that's especially true for visually impaired people. But this font looks amazing to me, it just pops out of the screen and is drastically easier to read than my old favorites.

It's really interesting (for me, anyway) to read about what they changed and why: recognizability, differentiation, exaggeration, removing ambiguity, so much thought went into increasing distinctiveness and recognition.

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@error_1202 I saw this yesterday and I was wondering what you'd think about it, thanks for posting!

@error_1202 holy shit this font is really good. I usually keep my terminal typefaces super small to increase the information on my tiny screen, but sometimes my eyes aren't great and I end up nose to the monitor 😅😅

I think it really says something that as someone with not-the-best-glasses/eyesight that I was able to squint a bit and still read the incredibly small writing on the PDF previews without strenuous effort.

The fact that this works for low-vision people as well is amazing, and the fact that it looks beautiful is honestly personally astonishing

Thank you so much for this!!

@thamesynne @alexandria It's always good to see people excited by a good font :)

@alexandria I'm so glad to hear you like it! It is really amazing what a difference a font can make.

@error_1202 ohhh that's so neat

this is going into the Good Fonts list immediately

@error_1202 Unfortunately, with my astigmatisms, it's no better, and sometimes worse, than plain Helvetica. :(

@vertigo Yep, well, this is why I explicitly said that there's no objectively superior font and no one thing that'll work for everyone with a vision impairment!

@error_1202 Yeah, I was hopeful though. :) I'd love to be able to use my devices without wearing my glasses from a precise distance away.

@vertigo I'd love to see my devices even with glasses and from a precise distance away!

@error_1202 thanks for linking it – i already sent it to a friend in gamedev who often complains about bad legibility and gets appropriately sparkly when games add an optional legible-fonts mode.

one minor thing that stoof out to me is that there seems to be no actual usage license except the wording ‘free for everyone’. or was i just too dumb to find it? would be nice to have stated explicitly whether it’s ok for noncommercial/personal only, or if commercial is ok as well.

@gekitsu The metadata says "Braille Institute of America, Inc., provides Atkinson Hyperlegible for use, without derivatives or alteration, to the public free of charge for all non-commerical and commercial work. No attribution required."

@error_1202 oooh, that’s phenomenal to hear! i only scoured the site and looked in the zip, i didn’t even think of the files themselves. brain is clearly mush.

many thanks for making me aware! i’ll forward this to gamedev friend, too.

@gekitsu No problem! I didn't specially go looking for it but I knew I'd seen it so I just had to remember where.

I'm really glad your friend is interested in this; video games are impossible for me for other reasons but honestly one of them is illegible text! It's a big deal. I'm glad there are people out there who care about it.

@error_1202 yes, when we discovered ‘tell me why’ had a simple toggle to switch from a fancy-looking typeface to a dyslexia-friendly one, we were both stunned. because that shouldn’t be an insurmountable thing to do. and yet, even that is so absurdly rare.

@gekitsu Yeah there's no technical barriers to this stuff, just cultural ones. A lot of my accessibility activism is highlighting this, but cultural changes are just so much more work and so much less sexy than "here's a cool new app/feature/gadget" /whatever.

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